Skip to main content

“I am a Canadian, free to speak without fear, free to worship in my own way, free to stand for what I think right, free to oppose what I believe wrong, or free to choose those who shall govern my country. This heritage of freedom I pledge to uphold for myself and all mankind.” ~~ John G. Diefenbaker

DAY SEVEN ... the week of January 26th to February 1st


Welcome once again to Day Seven ... where we look back at the weeks ten most read commentaries and op / ed pieces ... this week we also welcome Brian Peckford, and hope that you’ll enjoy his thoughtful comments.

But right now, let’s get into things.  Here is #10 ...


... we’ve always had to cope with outsiders and so-called experts telling us who best represents First Nations, or what we should do within our own territory. Yet none of these people have ever lived on reserve or spent any significant time with the people who actually live there. Think about it. It would be the same as me telling the people of BC to denounce the federal or provincial government because the Queen of England has final say in all matters ...



... we are concerned about a model of natural resource development in BC that has for too long relied upon simply extracting and exporting non-renewable resources, often in a way that benefits the shareholders of major multinational corporations more than it benefits local communities ... we have outstanding natural assets in BC, and we can be smarter and more innovative about how we manage them ...



... Sonia Furstenau, MLA for Cowichan Valley, is now in the running to be the next leader of the BC Green Party. In making the announcement in Victoria this morning Furstenau stated, “BC needs a new style of leadership that listens to evidence and to communities,” Furstenau said.


#7 ... PECKFORD: Canada’s Laggard Performance (02/01)

... on a number of occasions, I have highlighted Canada’s poor performance compared to other countries on ease of doing business. I have used the World Bank study that showed for last year Canada coming in a dismal 23. In two areas in particular we did really bad; 124th for the time it takes to get an electrical permit, and 64th in the time it takes to get a construction permit. Now comes another study ...



... the province has selected Morneau Shepell to develop a free mental health counselling and referral service for post-secondary students throughout BC ... chosen to create and operate a 24 / 7 mental health counselling and referral service for post-secondary students at all public and private post-secondary institutions ... will provide on-demand, immediate counselling and referral support to almost half a million students in public and private post-secondary institutions ...




... how much a municipal politician worth? A common answer among taxpayers is likely to be, less than they’re getting. It’s a serious question, though, and a challenging one. Councils have the unenviable job of deciding how much they should pay themselves. Unenviable, because while setting your own salary might seem like a dream come true, in politics it’s a deadly proposition ...



... social media channels continue to sizzle with people claiming to be “right” on the issue of Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, the Wet’suwet’en council, and the Coastal GasLink (CGL) pipeline. Our pages, like others, have been flooded with arguments supporting those hereditary chiefs opposed to the pipeline, or backing the elected council that supports the pipeline and its promised benefits ...


#3 ... FORSETH: While there’s a good likelihood participants will find work after completing their program, can someone explain why one will cost $18,000 per participant – and the other double that at $37,000 (01 / 30)

... So, here is my question ... or maybe questions? Tuesday’s announcement was to provide training for new career path opportunities that will allow British Columbians to support themselves and their families.  This program, for 25 individuals (both men and women) works out to, as I mentioned, $18,000 per person. Yesterdays announcement, is for what appears to be the same type of training ...


#2 ... YUILE: The bottom line for LNG investors is profit - there is nothing altruistic about pursuing these projects, no matter how much proponents try to paint them green and clean (01 / 29)

... having been a firm critic of fracking and the pursuit of LNG in BC for many more years than the NDP have been in power, I can still recall the time John Horgan said Christy Clark needed to do the LNG math and warned about focusing on LNG too much. Even though he was very open then about being a supporter of LNG, he wasn’t convinced it was prudent to invest so much into it, at the risk of leaving other sectors behind ...


AND NOW ... here is the commentary that caught the eyes of the most people this week ...


#1 ... FORSETH: A number of years ago The Eagles recorded and released a song entitled, “Get Over It”. To me at least, the lyrics seems appropriate to the situation (01 / 29)

... apparently, soon, to the government, means work will begin a year and a half from now ... and being completed will take in excess of two years from now. Which is why I find this statement from Vancouver – Kensington NDP MLA Mable Elmore little more than propaganda ... and an excuse, at taxpayer expense, to take a shot at the opposition party ...


And with that, we will put an end to this edition of the top ten most read commentaries of the week ... and also take the opportunity to welcome former Newfoundland Labrador Premier Brian Peckford to our team, with occasional commentaries from his blog Peckford 42.

Take care ... and we’ll be back again tomorrow.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The stats clearly demonstrate the need for professional and impartial advice at the time of purchase, renewal, and refinancing of mortgages

REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION : Canadian Mortgage Trends   Canadians need guidance with their mortgages ... t hat’s the takeaway from a national survey released this week by Rates.ca, which found half of Canadians aren’t aware of the mortgage options available to them. Not only that, but Canadians are lacking in some other basic mortgage trivia, with an astounding 9 out of 10 respondents not knowing that mortgage interest is charged semi-annually: 28% think interest is compounded monthly; 17% think it’s bi-weekly; 17% think it’s annually; 28% just have no idea. Should we be concerned? Dustan Woodhouse, President of Mortgage Architects, and a former active broker who has written multiple educational mortgage books, thinks so. “ Sounds about right. We know about what we pay attention to, i.e., The Kardashians ,” he wrote to CMT. “ The material concern in this is how easy it makes it for the government to over-regulate the industry, with c

THE SIDEWINDER -- Just quit your constant damned whining and do something positive about it

  Living in a democracy is a wonderful thing, but it comes with responsibilities such as voting and being involved. When the dust settled on Saturdays (October 24 th ) BC election, less than two thirds of the eligible voters * took the time to vote - but the loudest bitchers will probably be among the more than one third of voters who sat on their asses and complained about how all politicians are crooks, etc. How many of you constant whiners have ever done anything close to becoming involved; or do you just like sniveling to hear your own voice? Are you one the arseholes who likes to take advantage of everything our democracy has to offer, without ever contributing anything? And I don't want to listen to your crap about paying taxes, blah, blah, blah. There's more to making democracy work than simply voting and then sitting back and let others carry the ball for you. Too many people seem unwilling to get involved - and follow-up - to make sure elected po

AARON GUNN -- He is, at his core, an ideologue, meaning the facts of any particular issue don’t actually matter

Ben Isitt - City Councillor and Regional Director Victoria City Council and its resident-genius Ben Isitt is back with another dumb idea. Introducing a motion to ban the horse-drawn carriages that have coloured Victoria’s downtown streets for decades, calling them “an outdated mode of transportation”. Are you serious?   No one is actually commuting by horse and carriage. They are here for tourists and residents alike to interact with world-class animals and discover the magic and history of our provincial capital. It’s part of what gives Victoria its charm. And the truth is these horses are treated better than anywhere else in the world. They probably live better lives than many British Columbians.   And talk to anyone who works with these horses and they’ll all tell you the exact same thing: this is what the horses love to do. This is what they were bred for and trained for. This is what gives their lives purpose and meaning. But maybe we shouldn’t be su

Labels

Show more